💰 Knife Talk: Cripple Creek Cutlery

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EK was purchased by blackjack knives a few years back, blackjack is now amoeba'd by. They are also an important piece of combat knife history... I agree,there is nothing wrong with the IL(Effingham?) knives,they made ...


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In October 1991, the business moved to Effingham, Illinois, to set up operations. About the same time, Blackjack counterfeits were appearing on the market sold at a much cheaper price. Blackjack knives began as a company which imported and marketed specialized hunting, fighting and work knives from South Africa.


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This is an original John EK Limited Edition, Effingham IL, Made in USA commando knife. It is in mint condition except for two small scuffs on the front tip of blade ...


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Blackjack in Effingham was owned by Mike Steward and went out of business in 1997. Blackjack is now only a brand name not a company. The brand is owned by Blue Ridge knives. Mike now runs Bark River and makes Blackjack Classic Blades for Blue Ridge in the BR shop in MI.


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Blackjack knives Effingham IL USA Model 1- 7 Sub- Hilt Knife Black Micarta w/ box... Black Jack blackjack 1 7 effingham Knives History.


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Knife Talk: Cripple Creek Cutlery
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I have never had one.
They are obviously beautifully made knives….
Still one of my favorites.
History "A GOOD KNIFE CAN SAVE A LIFE" — John Ek, 1941 Considering the important 20th century American knife designers and makers, the name John Ek stands out with as much mystery as respect.
In a sense, he was the Jim Bowie of the 20th century.
As time passes and more is written about this man and his knives, his fame as a pioneer in American knife-making will continue to spread.
Like Bowie, John Ek pioneered a classic design unlike any other.
And his knives were made for fighting -- by American military personnel.
One newspaper article indicated that Ek knives "became surrounded almost immediately by an aura of fame and invincibility.
As he said in the mid-1970's: "There's been hardly a break without some kind of military involvement since 1941, so we've been busy with knives ever since.
Marine Raiders, Rangers, First Special Service Force, and British Commandoswho were highly respected for their knife-fighting abilities.
Ek often met with military personnel to discuss knife design and close-combat fighting.
Company reports indicate that he requested -- and received -- permission from the British War Office to use the term "Commando.
It is reported that President Franklin D.
Roosevelt kept a John Ek Commando Knife on his desk in the White House until the time of his death.
This certainly seems possible, as photographs exist of John Ek with a large display of Ek Commando Knives on exhibit in the White House in 1944.
John Ek even named his Model No.
MILITARY FIGHTING KNIVES The recorded information in our registry files shows that Ek knives were and are owned by men of all ranks in every branch of service -- Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, and Merchant Marine.
Their mailing addresses prove that Ek knives were used in blackjack knives effingham history theater of operation around the world.
In fact, Ek knives probably hold the record for being the leading privately-purchased military knives in American history.
During World War II, John Ek had very strong feelings about restricting his knives to active-duty servicemen.
He did not want his knives to fall into the wrong hands.
Ek felt his knives were the finest made and that they gave the user an advantage over any adversary.
His philosophy was "A knife is more deadly than a gun.
A gun will run out of ammunition, but as long as a person is behind a knife, it can kill.
The purchaser had to fill out a registration card certifying that the owner was a member of the armed forces, giving his name, rank, and service serial number.
This strict screening procedure also applied where knives were purchased by military men or individuals through dealers.
Before the knife would be made available, the individual had to fill out the same form, and it had to be returned to the company.
If a dealer failed to return a registration card, future orders were cut by the number of missing registrations until the missing card was returned.
John Ek could certainly have sold far more knives had he not been concerned about the strict registration procedure.
But he was a strongly patriotic American, a newspaper headline once calling him a "Modern Day Thomas Paine.
Government War Production Board tested and approved the designs of the Ek knives and authorized John Ek continued availability of the high-quality, nickel-chrome-moly steel.
As a strategic materiel, this was scarce.
It speaks well of the John Ek knife that the government wanted him to continue production and that he was admitted to the Army Ordnance Association.
Ek selected nickel-chrome-moly steel for his blades.
He found this material to be extremely strong, yet to have some degree of stain and rust resistance.
Of Swedish ancestry, Ek in later years would also use Swedish Sandvik stainless steel, upon request.
In April or May of 1939 John Ek designed the first John Ek Commando Knife which he named, appropriately, the Model No.
Actually, he thought that one model would be all that would be needed.
Later, a double-edged version of this the Model No.
Then crossguards were added to these versions, making them the Model No.
RUGGED DESIGN - FULL TANG Several aspects of his design made his knives distinctive and rugged.
First of all, the knife was of full-width, full-length tang construction.
Not only did the tang the extension of the blade which runs through the grips run the entire length of the grips, but the tang was also the full width of the grips.
In other words, the grips were about one inch wide and five inches long -- and so was that portion of the steel blade.
This provided maximum strength.
By comparison, most knives of the day even ones made today had narrow "rat-tail" tangs -- many running only one-third the length of the grip.
Also unusual was the extended butt, a direct extension of the blade and the blade tang itself.
Depending upon the year of manufacture, the butt could vary in length anywhere from nearly one inch to approximately one-half inch beyond the grip.
It could also be used as a pry bar for opening ammunition crates blackjack knives effingham history, according to Ek's 1944 manual, Your Silent Partner, for "an upstroke to lay your opponent out.
The extended butt of the Ek Commando Knife may possibly have inspired the design of the "skullcrusher" pommel on the First Special Service Force V-42 Stiletto, which appeared in 1943.
The grips were of Rock Maple, selected for a number of reasons.
John Ek preferred wood to leather, as the latter rotted, particularly under tropical conditions.
This also allowed the owner to custom fit the grip, by sanding, to the exact contour of his hand.
For a number of years the company included a piece of flint paper with each knife for this purpose.
The grips on his more-popular knives had eight scallops -- four on each of two grips.
The gripping power was so good that John Ek found that a crossguard was not necessary to prevent the hand from slipping.
When questioned about this by the War Production Board, Ek greased his hand and plunged one of his knives into the wooden floor with such force that no one was able to pull it out.
This dramatically demonstrated that the crossguard was not necessary to keep the hand from sliding onto the blade.
He preferred his knives without crossguards for ease of concealment and for quick withdrawal no crossguard to snag on clothes.
In fact, when his range of knives was finally expanded to 10 different models, only three of these had crossguards.
Evidently, military men agreed with him, as his Model No.
Note: The Model No.
Also unusual and distinctive were the "Poured-Lead" Rivets which were used to affix the two wooden grips to the blade tang.
Most knives at the time used standard cutlery rivets or pins, or they were simply driven onto the rat-tail tang.
The Poured-Lead Rivets had the advantage that, if the grips ever became loose, they could be tightened in the field without any tools.
All the owner needed to do was take a heavy object, such as a rock, and pound the lead rivets to tighten them.
Another advantage of the Poured-Lead Rivets was the extra weight which made the knife balance far better than most, as it added weight to the hilt.
This caused it to fall into the hand, rather than fall out of the hand.
Note: The present "X-Head Fastener System" enhances both of these benefits.
HAMDEN: 1944-1949 In January 1941, John Ek started producing knives in quantity in Hamden, Connecticut near Lake Whitney he had started making knives in 1939.
By 1943 he had put six different styles of knives into production, and the quantity of production increased.
By August 1944, demand for his knives had grown to the point https://pink-stuf.com/blackjack/edgewater-blackjack.html three shifts worked around the clock seven days a week, producing 10 different models.
Virtually all of the knives made in WWII by John Ek were numbered.
The first number on the blade is the model number; the subsequent numbers are the serial number, preceded by a letter of the alphabet.
Starting with the 1000th knife of each model, the letter A preceded the serial number.
Serial numbers following the alphabetical prefix went up to 999 prior to shifting over to the next letter of the alphabet.
For example, a knife numbered 1B299 means this is a Model 1, serial number B299.
Ek serially numbered these knives to help the owners keep track of them if they were lost, and also because he guaranteed each knife for the lifetime of the original owner.
By keeping the original owner's name on record, he could follow up his lifetime guarantee system.
Always interested in improving quality control, his lifetime guarantee increased the probability that he would learn of any mistakes he made.
He received back very few of his knives, because they were so rugged; there was very little to break or go wrong with them.
FLORIDA: 1949-1982 In 1949 John Ek moved to Miami, Florida where he continued production of his famous knives.
From here he provided knives to American forces during the Korean and Vietnam wars.
Miami-produced knives were marked "John Ek Knives, Miami, Fla.
You can't afford that much noise, so your knife and knowing how to use it are your best weapons.
The only knives suitable for this type of war and for survival use are your Commando knives.
I hope to have one of your knives when I return to the jungle.
I heard about your unique knives from a friend back in the world who said they were the best in the world and made specially for combat fighting.
Due blackjack card counting tutorial with mit andy bloch the growing crime rate in Miami, the Ek family decided to relocate the operation to St.
Augustine until 1982, when they moved it to Richmond, Virginia -- halfway between the earlier Connecticut and Florida locations.
RICHMOND: 1982 to Today In 1982, the Ek family moved the operation to Richmond, Virginia, then tranferred the direction and ownership of it to Robert A.
The Ek motto became "Constant Improvement," and changes made over the years help identify the date of origin.
Efforts concentrated on developing tighter technical specifications for the knives for higher and consistent quality.
They were made sharper razor sharp and more robust, with state-of-the-art materials.
Locations for the grip fastener system were moved for greater strength, and a new crossguard was developed.
This latter was thicker with quillons that curved forward slightly, to prevent jamming the thumb.
Poured-Lead Rivets were initially used in all production for the first several years, but this gave way to the newly-developed "X-Head Fastener System.
Yet, they also allowed quick removal and easy replacement of grips, if the owner desired.
Sturdy and split-proof Pakkawood and, later, Micarta, grips replaced the maple and, later, walnut grips of earlier knives.
Different sheath configurations were also developed, including the utilization of brown leather, black leather and later, olive drab, black, tan and ACU Mil-Spec web material.
In 1993 Blackjack Knives, Ltd.
When Blackjack ceased operations in the mid-1990's, the making of production knives returned to the Richmond operation, but back to its time-honored, benchmaking approach, with emphasis on quality, not quantity.
This is the Dunham-Wetherbee Award Corporal Jason Dunham, USMC, was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor in 2007 by President George W.
Marine Raider Association and inspired by their WWII Stiletto.
Also in 2004, Checkered Walnut grips were offered again for the first time.
In January 2005, blackjack apprentice basic strategy Ek Bowie Model 5 was re-introduced, and in January 2006 Poured-Lead Rivets were re-introduced, on a special-order basis.
In the spring of 2006, the new Army Combat Uniform ACU Universal Camouflage pattern was made available for Ek sheaths and with a new Paragrip® knife, the ACU Ranger.
They were modified, starting in March, 2007, by also running the Gripping Grooves over two of the three fastener grip flats.
Over these many years, the Ek Commando Knife Co.
The tradition continues, always influenced by the words of John Ek: "A good knife can save a life.
The thousands of letters he received during his lifetime from satisfied Soldiers, Marines, Sailors and Airmen were the ultimate satisfaction for this patriotic American.
His name, his knives, and the Ek Right! free blackjack online with friends nice Knife Co.
Identification of Ek Commando Knives Ek Commando Knives are nearly always marked with the location of the company at that time.
Richmond-marked knives can be dated as below: Lower banner etched "Commando": 1982-1991 Lower banner etched "Gulf War": 1991-2004 Sept.
Model numbers have changed over the years.
For example, an M4 has Micarta grips, double-edge blade and a crossguard.
Here is a guide for those who might be interested in getting into collecting Ek knives or looking to price one they may have.
This is an introductory guide to Ek knives that appear on eBay, rather than a complete history of the company and the different products made during its history.
This guide is intended for buyers new to Ek knives and sellers interested in appraising what they have, based on the eBay market value.
The author welcomes any corrections or updates experienced collectors may have.
This guide will address the four main "generations" of Ek knives appearing on eBay in the order in which they were originally made.
These were made during John Ek's lifetime.
By today's standards, the knives are crudely finished but they were dependable and built Ek's reputation as a supplier of private-purchase military knives.
During his lifetime, Ek sold the knives exclusively to soldiers.
The WW II knives were made in Hamden, Connecticut and knives made between 1949 and 1976 were made game information blackjack Miami, Florida.
Ek knives are marked with the location of their manufacture.
This is useful to determine in which conflict an Ek may have been used.
Also worth noting is the unusual serial numbering system found on Gen.
Letters replace the "thousands" place in the serial number of a given model.
A knife with the serial number D567 is actually the 4,567 knife made of that type.
Noted military knives historian Gary Boyd estimates over 100,000 "Hamden" knives were produced between 1941 and 1945.
After Ek moved to Miami, a flood in the 1970s destroyed the shop's records.
Most "Miami" knives were made during the mid to late '60s.
Boyd states the highest serial number he'd seen on a "Miami" knife was 411 and the knife was made in 1970-71 according to John Ek's son.
This combination of a low number and a late model year would indicate very few "Miami" knives were ever made.
Collectors have even been willing to take a chance that an old knife might be an Ek.
The real product commands a much higher price.
The winning bid was placed 5 seconds away from the auction's end.
This price remains consistent roughly 6 months later, showing only moderate drop.
The winning bid was placed 4 seconds away from the auction's end.
Its serial number was 1L890.
According to John Ek's original numbering system, the "1" indicates Model 1, the "L" is the 12th letter of the alphabet and stands for the "thousands" place in the serial number.
So, this particular Ek is the 12,890 Model 1 made by Ek.
A poor condition Gen.
Similar to the Gen1 Model 1 dagger is the Model 6.
It also has a a single edged blade and sharpened false edge 2-3 inches along the back.
The Model 6 also has a straight steel crossguard.
The winning bid was placed 5 seconds away from the auction's end.
The winning bid was placed 4 seconds away from the auction's end.
However, the reserve was not met.
Even an unmarked Model 2, claimed by the seller as "genuine" and sold with an Ek sheath made much later for the Gen.
The winning bid was placed 3 seconds away from the auction's end.
A mint in original box Gen.
Original Hamden-era accessories also command high prices among collectors.
Ek knives were sent with a a small booklet called "Your Silent Partner", which covered the different kind of knives available, their features, and basic care of the knives themselves.
The winning bid was placed 7 seconds away from the auction's end.
There are limits, even for collectors.
Both auctions closed on Oct-31-06 with no bids.
The two knives were relisted at the same price and closed on Nov-28-06, again with no bids.
Generation 2: 1982-1993 Richmond, Virginia After John Ek's death and a brief lull, the company relocated to Richmond, Virginia and continued making knives.
The company dramatically improved all aspects of quality.
Handles were made of finely grooved black Micarta and hand-checkered walnut handles were offered as an upgrade.
Machined link X-nut screws were standard and the original poured lead rivets became a rarely selected option.
Blades were ground out of stainless steel, mirror polished, and razor sharp.
A beautifully made leather scabbard was included.
These were richly finished in brown, black, or very rarely tan, and supplied with an elaborate combination of belt loops, retaining straps, and nylon parachute cord wrap.
Ek knives also were produced in a lower cost model with a handle made entirely of green or black and occasionally "desert camo" wrapped parachute cord and a heavy nylon-webbing sheath in a matching color.
A number blackjack 21 apk variants, such as Ek bowie knives, hunting knives, throwing knives, and reproductions of other WW II patterns such as the Australian bowie and the Murphy-pattern combat knife were also produced.
These variants do attract a surprising amount of interest.
This amount is very impressive considering the Ek throwing knife design is a bevelled length of steel with a point and is useless for anything except throwing.
While not the rarest or the most famous, "Richmond" knives are some of the best Ek's ever made, much superior to Gen.
For example, a Gen.
This is a typical closing price for M-4, a knife that best typifies the Gen.
The leather sheaths are an important collectible too, costing almost as much as the knives themselves.
As with all collectible knives, condition plays an important part in setting the final price.
An unusual Ek Gen.
Even so, there was some interest and the winning bid was placed 6 seconds away from the auction's end.
Even the entirely cordwrapped handle versions command high prices.
The price increased from 100.
The winning bid was placed 7 seconds away from the auction's end.
Variant Ek knives can command very high prices.
The winning bid was placed 5 seconds away from the auction's end.
An equally uncommon variant, the Ek boot knife was most frequently seen with a cord wrapped handle in either green or tan camoflage and either a leather or nylon web sheath.
The winning bid was placed 21 seconds away from the auction's end.
The M-6 was a later addition to the Ek line.
The introduction of the Ek bowie was one of the first signs Ek was beginning to see sales decline.
The blade design represented a major departure from the standard Ek dagger line up to that point and was an attempt to reach a broader market.
Ek bowies were shipped with the nylon web sheaths normally included with the cord wrapped-handle lower cost knives.
Other variants, while equally rare don't attract as much attention.
Versions include the "SOF" bowie which had a blade very similar to the "MACVSOG" bowie used by Special Forces troops in Vietnam and the "Desert Bowie" which had a full-length fully sharpened back edge.
The "SOF" bowie had the same guard and micarta handle as Ek daggers while the "Desert Bowie" had a cordwrapped handle which supposedly didn't retain as much heat if used in the desert.
A new auction record was set on Feb-04-07 for a regular production knife.
The bowie blade had a sharpened article source clip, but was not fully double edged.
The major difference was the grips were made out of walnut and hand checkered at the factory.
The sheath was made of nylon webbing.
Commemorative Ek knives typically sell for much higher due to their rarity and their extra embellishment.
However, the reserve was not met.
A rare, Desert Storm matched set consisting of a bowie and a boot knife, both with special Desert Storm blade etch and desert camo cord wrapped handles sold on Jan-20-07 for 221.
The knife was mirror polished, with stag handles, a gold inlaid inscription on the blade, engraved gold plated cross guard and engraved gold plated X-nuts.
The knife was housed in a furniture-grade glass fronted oak display box.
The auction ended on Nov-26-06 with no bids.
The winning bid was placed 5 seconds away from the auction's end.
An EK Model 4 commemorative dagger issued by the American Heritage Foundation Vietnam Ek Fighting Knife honoring the USMC Force Recon had an engraved blade, gold plated X-nut fasteners and guard, and housed in an oak display box.
The winning bid was placed 8 seconds away from the auction's end.
Before Ek finally went out of business, the company tried to save itself by expanding its line with some hunting knives.
These were made in small numbers, are rare, and retained the Gen.
It has brown pakka wood handle scales secured to a full tang with two flush brass rivets not the famous Ek X-nut fasteners.
Generation 3 1993-1997 Effingham, Illinois The end of the 80s hit the knife industry hard and a firm specializing in entirely in hand finished, expensive knives wouldn't survive the next decade.
Blackjack Knives bought Ek, and moved production over to Blackjack's plant in Effingham, Illinois.
Initially, quality was quite good.
From the start, leather scabbards were discontinued to cut costs and the nylon-webbing sheath was instead substituted on all models.
Later as Blackjack itself started to fail, the quality of the knives began to slip noticeably.
Toward the end Blackjack, like the original company at the end of the Gen.
Blackjack began desperately producing small lots of vastly different knives marked with the Ek brand in an attempt to catch the knife-buying public's attention.
Blackjack started marking "Ek" on hunting knives, a are mulligan blackjack congratulate of small boot knives, and small production runs of knives made by completing earlier unfinished parts.
Many of these small production runs are the rarest knives ever to carry the Ek brand name, several runs numbering only a few hundred or less.
Collector interest in "Effingham" knives varies widely.
Even so, sellers of "Richmond" knives routinely emphasize the difference in quality.
Some of the "last gasp" knives turned out by Blackjack will attract enough attention from advanced collectors blackjack knives effingham history drive the price up to the lower end of Gen.
Blackjack's embellished commemoratives do command better than average prices.
The winning bid was placed 4 seconds away from the auction's end.
Mint examples from the smaller runs manufactured at the end of Blackjack's history can sell for incredibly high prices, rivalling and sometimes surpassing the Richmond-made Gen.
Blackjack made a fine replica of Sam Houston's bowie with coffin handles and a foot long blade for the U.
The over-runs were fitted with gorgeous cocobolo wood grips and marked with the Ek Commando logo.
The knife itself had absolutely nothing to do with the Ek line, didn't look at all like an Ek knife.
That didn't stop Blackjack from slapping the EK Commando Knives logo on it in an effort to generate some hype.
Less than two dozen were made and didn't even come with boxes, just a sheath.
This same bowie with black buffalo horn handles closed at new record for modern Ek knives.
The winning bid was placed 21 seconds away from the auction's end.
One alternative Blackjack introduced was a radically simplified dagger known as the "Pigsticker".
It has a narrow blade with parallel edges and a keen point.
Handles vary from cordwrap to maple secured with copper rivets.
Sheaths are usually leather.
The winning bid was placed 2 seconds away from the auction's end.
Generation 4: 1997- the present Richmond, Virginia -again.
Like Kimber Firearms, a group of employees bought the rights to Ek and have resurrected the company, reintroducing most of the standard patterns from the 1980s.
Best of all, Ek knives are again made to that same high standard of quality.
Only the leather scabbards haven't been re-introduced.
The modern knives are also marked "Richmond, Virginia", which makes distinguishing them from the original 80's-era knives, a bit difficult.
This is hardly accidental, as the new Ek company wants to make a brand connection to the firm's reputation for extremely high quality back in the 80s.
The easiest way to distinguish a current production Ek from an 80s production Ek is the company logo on the blade.
The large banner includes "Gulf War, Iraqi War" along the bottom half.
Two daggers have appeared on eBay at the time of this writing.
The winning bid was placed 2 seconds away from the auction's end.
The same seller of the previously mentioned Ek daggers also sold a Gen.
The blackjack collective bid was placed 19 seconds away from the auction's end.
The knife had fully checkered walnut grips and special blade etch.
The low price is due to the poor condition of the knife which included chips along the edge, a damaged point, and dark pitting on the blade.
History "A GOOD KNIFE CAN SAVE A LIFE" — John Ek, 1941 Considering the important 20th century American knife designers and makers, the name John Ek stands out with as much mystery as respect.
In a sense, he was the Jim Bowie of the 20th century.
As time passes and more is written about this man and his knives, his fame as a pioneer in American knife-making will continue to spread.
Like Bowie, John Ek pioneered a classic design unlike any other.
And his knives were made for fighting -- by American military personnel.
One newspaper article indicated that Ek knives "became surrounded almost immediately by an aura of fame and invincibility.
As he said in the mid-1970's: "There's been hardly a break without some kind of military involvement since 1941, so we've been busy with knives ever since.
Marine Raiders, Rangers, First Special Service Force, and British Commandoswho were highly respected for their knife-fighting abilities.
Ek often met with military personnel to discuss knife design and close-combat fighting.
Company reports indicate that he requested -- and received -- permission from the British War Office to use the term "Commando.
It is reported that President Franklin D.
Roosevelt kept a John Ek Commando Knife on his desk in the White House until the time blackjack knives effingham history his death.
This certainly seems possible, as photographs exist of John Ek with a large display of Ek Commando Knives on exhibit in the White House in 1944.
John Ek even named his Model No.
MILITARY FIGHTING KNIVES The recorded information in our registry files shows that Ek knives were and are owned by men of all ranks in every branch of service -- Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, and Merchant Marine.
Their mailing addresses prove that Ek knives were used in every theater of operation around the world.
In fact, Ek knives probably hold the record for being the leading privately-purchased military knives in American history.
During World War II, John Ek had very strong feelings about restricting his knives to active-duty servicemen.
He did not want his knives to fall into the wrong hands.
Ek felt his knives were the finest made and that they gave the user an advantage over any adversary.
His philosophy was "A knife is more deadly than a gun.
A gun will run out of ammunition, but as long as a person is behind a knife, it can kill.
The purchaser had to fill out a registration card certifying that the owner was a member of the armed forces, giving his name, rank, and service serial number.
This strict screening procedure also applied where knives were purchased by military men or individuals through dealers.
Before the knife would be made available, the individual had to fill out the same form, and it had to be returned to the company.
If a dealer failed to return a registration card, future orders were cut by the number of missing registrations until the missing card was returned.
John Ek could certainly have sold far more knives had he just click for source been concerned about the strict registration procedure.
But he was a strongly patriotic American, a newspaper headline once calling him a "Modern Day Thomas Paine.
Government War Production Board tested and approved the designs of the Ek knives and authorized Source Ek continued availability of the high-quality, nickel-chrome-moly steel.
As a strategic materiel, this was scarce.
It speaks well of the John Ek knife that the government wanted him to continue production and that he was admitted to the Army Ordnance Association.
Ek continue reading nickel-chrome-moly steel for his blades.
He found this material to be extremely strong, yet to have some degree of stain and rust resistance.
Of Swedish ancestry, Ek in later years would also use Swedish Sandvik stainless steel, upon request.
In April or May of 1939 John Ek designed the first John Blackjack knives effingham history Commando Knife which he named, appropriately, the Model No.
Actually, he thought that one model would be all that would be needed.
Later, a double-edged version of this the Model No.
Then crossguards were added to these versions, making them the Model No.
RUGGED DESIGN - FULL TANG Several aspects of his design made his knives distinctive and rugged.
First of all, the knife was of full-width, full-length tang construction.
Not only did the tang the extension of the blade which runs through the grips run the entire length of the grips, but the tang was also the full width of the grips.
In other words, the grips were about one inch wide and five inches long -- and so was that portion of the steel blade.
This provided maximum strength.
By comparison, most knives of the day even ones made today had narrow "rat-tail" tangs -- many running only one-third the length of the grip.
Also unusual was the extended butt, a direct extension of the blade and the blade tang itself.
Depending upon the year of manufacture, the butt could vary in length anywhere from nearly one inch to approximately one-half inch beyond the grip.
It could also be used as a pry bar for opening ammunition crates or, according to Ek's 1944 manual, Your Are flash casino blackjack ballroom congratulate Partner, for "an upstroke to lay your opponent out.
The extended butt of the Ek Commando Knife may possibly have inspired the design of the "skullcrusher" pommel on the First Special Service Force V-42 Stiletto, which appeared in 1943.
The grips were of Rock Maple, selected for a number of reasons.
John Ek preferred wood to leather, as the latter rotted, particularly under tropical conditions.
This also allowed the owner to custom fit the grip, by sanding, to the exact contour of his hand.
For a number of years the company included a piece of flint paper with each can professional blackjack player online you for this purpose.
The grips on his more-popular knives had eight scallops -- four on each of two grips.
The gripping power was so good that John Ek found that a crossguard was not necessary to prevent the hand from slipping.
When questioned about this by the War Production Board, Ek greased his hand and plunged one of his knives into the wooden floor with such force that no one was able to pull it out.
This dramatically demonstrated that the crossguard was not necessary to keep the hand from sliding onto the blade.
He preferred his knives without crossguards for ease of concealment and for quick withdrawal no crossguard to snag on clothes.
In fact, when his range of knives was finally expanded to 10 different models, only three of these had crossguards.
Evidently, military men agreed with him, as his Model No.
Note: The Model No.
Also unusual and distinctive were the "Poured-Lead" Rivets which were used to affix the two wooden grips to the blade tang.
Most knives at the time used standard cutlery rivets or pins, or they were simply driven onto the rat-tail tang.
The Poured-Lead Rivets had the advantage that, if the grips ever became loose, they could be tightened in the field without any tools.
All the owner needed to do was take a heavy object, such as a rock, and pound the lead rivets to tighten them.
Another advantage of the Poured-Lead Rivets was the extra weight which made the knife balance far better than most, as it added weight to the hilt.
This caused it to fall into the hand, rather than fall out of the hand.
Note: The present "X-Head Fastener System" enhances both of these benefits.
HAMDEN: 1944-1949 In January 1941, John Ek started producing knives in quantity in Hamden, Connecticut near Lake Whitney he had started making knives in 1939.
By 1943 he had put six different styles of knives into production, and the quantity of production increased.
By August 1944, demand for his knives had grown to the point where three shifts worked around the clock seven days a week, producing 10 different models.
Virtually all of the knives made in WWII by John Ek were numbered.
The first number on the blade is the model number; the subsequent numbers are the serial number, preceded by a letter of the alphabet.
Starting with the 1000th knife of each model, the letter A preceded the serial number.
Serial numbers following the alphabetical prefix went up to 999 prior to shifting over to the next letter of the alphabet.
For example, a knife numbered 1B299 means this is a Model 1, serial number B299.
Ek serially numbered these knives to help the owners keep track of them if they were lost, and also because he guaranteed blackjack knives effingham history knife for the lifetime of the original owner.
By keeping the original owner's name on record, he could follow up his lifetime guarantee system.
Always interested in improving quality control, his lifetime guarantee increased the probability that he would learn of any mistakes he made.
He received back very few of his knives, because they were so rugged; there was very little to break or go wrong with them.
FLORIDA: 1949-1982 In 1949 John Ek moved to Miami, Florida where he continued production of his famous knives.
From here he provided knives to American forces during the Korean and Vietnam wars.
Miami-produced knives were marked "John Ek Knives, Miami, Fla.
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Due to the growing crime rate in Miami, the Ek family decided to relocate the operation to St.
Augustine until 1982, when they moved it to Richmond, Virginia -- halfway between the earlier Connecticut and Florida locations.
RICHMOND: 1982 to Today In 1982, the Ek family moved the operation to Richmond, Virginia, then tranferred the direction and ownership of it to Robert A.
The Ek motto became "Constant Improvement," and changes made over the years help identify the date of origin.
Efforts concentrated on developing tighter technical specifications for the knives for higher and consistent quality.
They were made sharper razor sharp and more robust, with state-of-the-art materials.
Locations for the grip fastener system were moved for greater strength, and a new crossguard was developed.
This latter was thicker with quillons that curved forward slightly, to prevent jamming the thumb.
Poured-Lead Rivets were initially used in all production for the first several years, but this gave way to the newly-developed "X-Head Fastener System.
Yet, they also allowed quick removal and easy replacement of grips, if the owner desired.
Sturdy and split-proof Pakkawood and, later, Micarta, grips replaced the maple and, later, walnut grips of earlier knives.
Different sheath configurations were also developed, including the utilization of brown leather, black leather and later, olive drab, black, tan and ACU Mil-Spec web material.
In 1993 Blackjack Knives, Ltd.
When Blackjack ceased operations in the mid-1990's, the making of production knives returned to the Richmond operation, but back to its time-honored, benchmaking approach, with emphasis on quality, not quantity.
This is the Dunham-Wetherbee Award Corporal Jason Dunham, USMC, was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor in 2007 by President George W.
Marine Raider Association and inspired by their WWII Stiletto.
Also in 2004, Checkered Walnut grips were offered again for the first time.
In January 2005, the Ek Bowie Model 5 was re-introduced, and in January 2006 Poured-Lead Rivets were re-introduced, on a special-order basis.
In the spring of 2006, the new Army Combat Uniform ACU Universal Camouflage pattern was made available for Ek sheaths and with a new Paragrip® knife, the ACU Ranger.
They were modified, starting in March, 2007, by also running the Gripping Grooves over two of the three fastener grip flats.
Over these many years, the Ek Commando Knife Co.
The tradition continues, always influenced by the words of John Ek: "A good knife can save a life.
The thousands of letters he received during his lifetime from satisfied Soldiers, Marines, Sailors and Airmen were the ultimate satisfaction for this patriotic American.
His name, his knives, and the Ek Commando Knife Co.
Identification of Ek Commando Knives Ek Commando Knives are nearly always marked with the location of the company at that time.
Richmond-marked knives can be dated as below: Lower banner etched "Commando": 1982-1991 Lower banner etched "Gulf War": 1991-2004 Sept.
Model numbers have changed over the years.
For example, an M4 has Micarta grips, double-edge blade and a crossguard.
Here is a guide for those who might be interested in getting into collecting Ek knives or looking to price one they may have.
This is an introductory guide to Ek knives that appear on eBay, rather than a complete history of the company and the different products made during its history.
This guide is intended for buyers new to Ek knives and sellers interested in appraising what they have, based on the eBay market value.
The author welcomes any corrections or updates experienced collectors may have.
This guide will address the four main "generations" of Ek knives appearing on eBay in the order in which they were originally made.
These were made during John Ek's lifetime.
By today's standards, the knives are crudely finished but they were dependable and built Ek's reputation as a supplier of private-purchase military knives.
During his lifetime, Ek sold the knives exclusively to soldiers.
The WW II knives were made in Hamden, Connecticut and knives made between 1949 and 1976 were made in Miami, Florida.
Ek knives are marked with the location of their manufacture.
This is useful to determine in which conflict an Ek may have been used.
Also worth noting is the unusual serial numbering system found on Gen.
Letters replace the "thousands" place in the serial number of a given model.
A knife with the serial number D567 is actually the 4,567 knife made of that type.
Noted military knives historian Gary Boyd estimates over 100,000 "Hamden" knives were produced between 1941 and 1945.
After Ek moved to Miami, a flood in the 1970s destroyed the shop's records.
Most "Miami" knives were made during the mid to late '60s.
Boyd states the highest serial number he'd seen on a "Miami" knife was 411 and the knife was made in 1970-71 according to John Ek's son.
This combination of a low number and a late model apologise, is blackjack rigged in casinos excellent would indicate very few "Miami" knives were ever made.
Collectors have even been willing to take a chance that an old knife might be an Ek.
The real product commands a much higher price.
The winning bid was placed 5 seconds away from the auction's end.
This price remains consistent roughly 6 months later, showing only moderate drop.
The winning bid was placed 4 seconds away from the auction's end.
Its serial number was 1L890.
According to John Ek's original numbering system, the "1" indicates Model 1, the "L" is the 12th letter of the alphabet and stands for the "thousands" place in the serial number.
So, this particular Ek is the 12,890 Model 1 made by Ek.
A poor condition Gen.
Similar to the Gen1 Model 1 dagger is the Model 6.
It also has a a single edged blade and sharpened false edge 2-3 inches along the back.
The Model 6 also has a straight steel crossguard.
The winning bid was placed 5 seconds away from the auction's end.
The winning bid was placed 4 seconds away from the auction's end.
However, the reserve was not met.
Even an unmarked Model 2, claimed by the seller as "genuine" and sold with an Ek sheath made much later for the Gen.
The winning bid was placed 3 seconds away from the auction's end.
A mint in original box Gen.
Original Hamden-era accessories also command high prices among collectors.
Ek knives were sent with a a small booklet called "Your Silent Partner", which covered the different kind of knives available, their features, and basic care of the knives themselves.
The winning bid was placed 7 seconds away from the auction's end.
There are limits, even for collectors.
Both auctions closed on Oct-31-06 with no bids.
The two knives were relisted at the same price and closed on Nov-28-06, again with no bids.
Generation 2: 1982-1993 Richmond, Virginia After John Ek's death and a brief lull, the company relocated to Richmond, Virginia and continued making knives.
The company dramatically improved all aspects of quality.
Handles were made of finely grooved black Micarta and hand-checkered walnut handles were offered as an upgrade.
Machined brass X-nut screws were standard and the original poured lead rivets became a rarely selected option.
Blades were ground out of stainless steel, mirror polished, and razor sharp.
A beautifully made leather scabbard was included.
These were richly finished in brown, black, or very rarely tan, and supplied with an elaborate combination of belt loops, retaining straps, and nylon parachute cord wrap.
Ek knives also were produced in a lower cost model with a handle made entirely of green or black and occasionally "desert camo" wrapped parachute cord and a heavy nylon-webbing sheath in a matching color.
A number of variants, such as Ek bowie knives, hunting knives, throwing knives, and reproductions of other WW II patterns such as the Australian bowie and the Murphy-pattern combat knife were also produced.
These variants do attract a surprising amount of interest.
This amount is very impressive considering the Ek throwing knife design is a bevelled length of steel with a point and is useless for anything except throwing.
While not the rarest or the most famous, "Richmond" knives are some of the best Ek's ever made, much superior to Gen.
For example, a Gen.
This is a typical closing price for M-4, a knife that best typifies the Gen.
The leather sheaths are an important collectible too, costing almost as much as the knives themselves.
As with blackjack bo3 collectible knives, condition plays an important part in setting the final price.
An unusual Ek Gen.
Even so, there was some interest and the winning bid was placed 6 seconds away from the auction's end.
Even the entirely cordwrapped handle versions command high prices.
The price increased from 100.
The winning bid was placed 7 seconds away from the auction's end.
Variant Ek knives can command very high prices.
The winning bid was placed 5 seconds away from the auction's end.
An equally uncommon variant, the Ek boot knife was most frequently seen with a cord wrapped handle in either green or tan camoflage and either a leather or nylon web sheath.
see more winning bid was placed 21 seconds away from the auction's end.
The M-6 was a later addition to the Ek line.
The introduction of the Ek bowie was one of the first signs Ek was beginning to see sales decline.
The blade design represented a major departure from the standard Ek dagger line up to that point and was an attempt to reach a broader market.
Ek bowies were shipped with the nylon web source normally included with the cord wrapped-handle lower cost knives.
Other variants, while equally rare don't attract as much attention.
Versions include the "SOF" bowie which had a blade very similar to learn more here "MACVSOG" bowie used by Special Forces troops in Vietnam and the "Desert Bowie" which had a full-length fully sharpened back edge.
The "SOF" bowie had the same guard and micarta handle as Ek daggers while the "Desert Bowie" had a cordwrapped handle which supposedly didn't retain as much heat if used in the desert.
A new auction record was set on Feb-04-07 for a regular production knife.
The bowie blade had a sharpened top clip, but was not fully double edged.
The major difference was the grips were made out of walnut and hand checkered at the factory.
The sheath was made of nylon webbing.
Commemorative Ek knives typically sell for much higher due to their rarity and their extra embellishment.
However, the reserve was not met.
A rare, Desert Storm matched set consisting of a bowie and a boot knife, both with special Desert Storm blade etch and desert camo cord wrapped handles sold on Jan-20-07 for 221.
The knife was mirror polished, with stag handles, a gold inlaid inscription on the blade, engraved gold plated cross guard and engraved gold plated X-nuts.
The knife was housed in a furniture-grade glass fronted oak display box.
The auction ended on Nov-26-06 with no bids.
The winning bid was placed 5 seconds away from the auction's end.
An EK Model 4 commemorative dagger issued by the American Heritage Foundation Vietnam Ek Fighting Knife honoring the USMC Force Recon had an engraved blade, gold plated X-nut fasteners and guard, and housed in an oak display box.
The winning bid was placed 8 seconds away from the auction's end.
Before Ek finally went out of business, the company tried to save itself by expanding its line with some hunting knives.
These were made in small numbers, are rare, and retained the Gen.
It has brown pakka wood handle scales secured to a full tang with two flush brass rivets not the famous Ek X-nut fasteners.
Generation 3 1993-1997 Effingham, Illinois The end of the 80s hit the knife industry hard and a firm specializing in entirely in hand finished, expensive knives wouldn't survive the next decade.
Blackjack Knives bought Ek, and moved production over to Blackjack's plant in Effingham, Illinois.
Initially, quality was quite good.
From the start, leather scabbards were discontinued to cut costs and the nylon-webbing sheath was instead substituted on all models.
Later as Blackjack itself started to fail, the quality of the knives began to slip noticeably.
Toward the end Blackjack, like the original company at the end of the Gen.
Blackjack began desperately producing small lots of vastly different knives marked with the Ek brand in an attempt to catch the knife-buying public's attention.
Blackjack started marking "Ek" on hunting knives, a variety of small boot knives, and small production runs of knives made by completing earlier unfinished parts.
Many of these small production runs are the rarest knives ever to carry the Ek brand name, several runs numbering only a few hundred or less.
Collector interest in "Effingham" knives varies widely.
Even so, sellers of "Richmond" knives routinely emphasize the difference in quality.
Some of the "last gasp" knives turned out by Blackjack will attract enough attention from advanced collectors to drive the price up to the lower end of Gen.
Blackjack's embellished commemoratives do command better than average prices.
The winning bid was placed 4 seconds away from the auction's end.
Mint examples from the smaller runs manufactured at the end of Blackjack's history can sell for incredibly high prices, rivalling and sometimes surpassing the Richmond-made Gen.
Blackjack made a fine replica of Sam Houston's bowie with coffin handles and a foot long blade for the U.
The over-runs were fitted with gorgeous cocobolo wood grips and marked with the Ek Commando logo.
The knife itself had absolutely nothing to do with the Ek line, didn't look at all like an Ek knife.
That didn't stop Blackjack from slapping the EK Commando Knives logo check this out it in an effort to generate some hype.
Less than two dozen were made and didn't even come with boxes, just a sheath.
This same bowie with black buffalo horn handles closed at new record for modern Ek knives.
The winning bid was placed 21 seconds away from the auction's end.
One alternative Blackjack introduced was a radically simplified dagger known as the "Pigsticker".
It has a narrow blade with parallel edges and a keen point.
Handles vary from cordwrap to maple secured with copper rivets.
Sheaths are usually leather.
The winning bid was placed 2 seconds away from the auction's end.
Generation 4: 1997- the present Richmond, Virginia -again.
Like Kimber Firearms, a group of employees bought the rights to Ek and have resurrected the company, reintroducing most of the standard patterns from the 1980s.
Best of all, Ek knives are again made to that same high standard of quality.
Only the leather scabbards haven't been re-introduced.
The modern knives are also marked "Richmond, Virginia", which makes distinguishing them from the original 80's-era knives, a bit difficult.
This is hardly accidental, as the new Ek company wants to make a brand connection to the firm's reputation for extremely high quality back in the 80s.
The easiest way to distinguish a current production Ek blackjack knives effingham history an 80s production Ek is the company logo on the blade.
The large banner includes "Gulf War, Iraqi War" along the bottom half.
Two daggers have appeared please click for source eBay at the time of this writing.
The winning bid was placed 2 seconds away from the auction's end.
The same seller of the previously mentioned Ek daggers also sold a Gen.
The winning bid was placed 19 seconds away from the auction's end.
The knife had fully checkered walnut grips and special blade etch.
The low price is due to the poor condition of the knife which included chips along the edge, a damaged point, and dark pitting on the blade.
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This blog covers my search blackjack knives effingham history knives from around the world and discoveries that I have learned while doing research.
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In 1981, Bob Blackjack knives effingham history formed Cripple Creek Cutlery in Lockport, Illinois.
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Cargill had been involved in collecting antique factory made knives for a number https://pink-stuf.com/blackjack/blackjack-odds-of-busting.html years and had served several years as a factory authorized repairman for W.
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Primarily noting the shield and stamping make identification of a Cripple Creek.
Production of the standard Cripple Creek patterns in 1981 was approximately 500 knives and approximately 250 in 1982.
Shortly after introduction of the check this out, Cripple Creek contracted to make a special knife for Knife World Publications.
Therein lies the reason for the very low production of regular Cripple Creek Little Indian series knives during this period.
A variety of handle materials has been used for Cripple Creek, but the majority of knives have been handled in bone.
It became a favorite for go here of the brand.
Other collectors used have been brown bone, strawberry bone, green bone, and white bone.
Except for 1986, when Christmas celluloid and red-white-blue Micarta were used on two special knives, natural handled materials have been used.
Stag has been second in use to bone, followed by mother of pearl.
As with all knives, values of Cripple Creek vary depending upon pattern, years made, and handle material used.
With this brand of knives, however, it is possible to offer some general value guidelines for mint condition knives that apply to all or most patterns.
With the limited production of regular patterns in 1982, any standard Cripple Creek pattern knife dated that year will be valued as highly as one produced in 1981.
In 1984, Cripple Creek produced the five-blade blackjack knives effingham history stockman in three handle materials.
In 1993, Cripple Creek knives was sold to Blackjack Knives and production moved from Tennessee to Effingham, Illinois.
A limited number of patterns were produced there prior to ownership of the brand returning to Cargill and to Tennessee.
Using the United States Patent and Trademark OfficeI did find a current web site for Cripple Creek Knives: The current owner blackjack knives effingham history Martin, Phillip S.
DBA Blue Ridge Knives.
A nasty fellow who helped destroy the 'NKCA'.
While president of the NKCA, thousands of dollars of member's money disappeared.
Countless requests for an accounting of funds were never answered.
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Those responsible are burning and will burn in hell; I hope.

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Visits
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This blog covers my search for knives from around the blackjack knives effingham history and discoveries that I have learned while doing research.
Also the wonderful people I have encountered while traveling with wonderful stories to share.
In 1981, Bob Cargill formed Cripple Creek Cutlery in Lockport, Illinois.
His goal was the revival of old-time patterns and production of them in limited numbers.
Cargill had been involved in collecting antique factory made knives for a number of years and had served several years as a factory authorized repairman for W.
More recently, he had been a custom knife maker for half dozen years and many of his custom knives were patterned after antique favorites.
Cripple Creek was the fruition of a dream blackjack knives effingham history apply modern day handcrafting methods with age-old favorite knives.
Primarily noting the shield and stamping make identification of a Cripple Creek.
Production blackjack knives effingham history the standard Cripple Creek patterns in 1981 was approximately 500 knives and approximately 250 in 1982.
Shortly after introduction of the brand, Cripple Creek contracted to make a special knife for Knife World Publications.
Therein lies the reason for the very low production of regular Cripple Creek Little Indian series knives during this period.
A variety of handle materials has been used for Cripple Creek, but the majority of knives have been handled in bone.
It became maryland casino table minimums favorite for collectors of the brand.
Other collectors used have been brown bone, strawberry bone, green bone, and white bone.
Except for 1986, when Christmas celluloid and red-white-blue Micarta were used on two special https://pink-stuf.com/blackjack/247-blackjack.html, natural handled materials have been used.
Stag has been second in use to bone, followed by mother of pearl.
As with all knives, values of Cripple Creek vary depending upon pattern, years made, and handle material used.
With this brand of knives, however, it is possible to offer some general value guidelines for mint condition knives that apply to all or most patterns.
With the limited production of regular patterns in 1982, any standard Cripple Creek pattern knife dated that year will be valued as highly as one produced in 1981.
In 1984, Cripple Creek produced the five-blade sowbelly stockman in three handle materials.
In 1993, Cripple Creek knives was sold to Blackjack Knives and production moved from Tennessee to Effingham, Illinois.
A limited number of patterns were produced there mgm tournament to ownership of the brand returning to Cargill and to Tennessee.
Using the United States Patent and Trademark OfficeI did blackjack knives effingham history a current web site for Cripple Creek Knives: The current owner is Martin, Phillip S.
DBA Blue Ridge Knives.
A nasty fellow who helped destroy the 'NKCA'.
While president of the NKCA, thousands of dollars of member's money disappeared.
Countless requests for an accounting of funds were never answered.
This finally led to the demise of the KNCA, the museum and all the museum knives; a sad state of affairs.
Those responsible are burning and will burn in hell; I hope.