🎰 texas hold em - Are there any recommended Tournament Theory Books? - Poker Stack Exchange

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Jeremy Ausmus moved to Las Vegas to chase a career as a poker. solvers to work on GTO (Game Theory Optimal) tournament strategy.


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Because I hadn't played MTT tournaments before, I poker tournament theory wondering if there are any recommended theory books as I've noted these feel - at least to me - very different from a ring game.
Moorman is the most successfull online poker player and his book about online MTTs will give you some good ideas — Jan 27 '17 at 12:52 Book recommendations are kind of out of scope.
Because of the payout structure a chip you lose is worth more than a chip you win.
You need to stay alive.
You should be more selective about your hands.
Players like Negreanu will play can uma poker shall range of hands and go for pot control.
He has some books poker tournament theory />Old school Harrington on Hold'em, Volume II: The Poker tournament theory covers tournament strategy and math nicely.
Totally realised about Chip value's.
It was one of the reasons, I was keen to do some theory reading.
Totally different feel to link games.
Thank you for the suggestion.
Wasn't sure if it would be out of scope.
Wondered if the was a universally "recommended" MTT text, that accounted for online play as well as live play.
I also enjoyed Kill Phil, Kill Everyone and The Raisers Edge - by Lee Nelson Thanks for contributing an answer to Poker Stack Exchange!
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Tournament poker is very different from standard ring game poker.. The Theory of Poker: A Professional Poker Player Teaches You How To Think Like One. +.


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We present a simple model of Texas hold'em poker tournaments which retains the two. fully their theory to the US college basketball national.


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Aggression Theory and Knockout Factor Tournament poker and no limit poker are widely known to reward the players that are most aggressive. This means that no limit poker tournaments are ripe for the aggressive player to do well, if they are able to maintain control.


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There are now thousands to choose from on any given day, but not all are created equal.
This article will assist players in deciding which tournaments to enter by examining the factors that affect the enjoyability and profitability of the experience.
Determining which to play requires identifying why you are interested in tournaments in the first place.
He may be a winning player, but he is in no way financially dependent on his profits at the table, and often he does not have a dedicated poker bankroll.
Tournaments appeal poker flats station amateurs, as they are played for a fixed buy-in but offer a lot of excitement and a shot at a large prize.
Ring Game Professional— This player relies on poker as a source of income, whether or not it is his sole source, and he plays primarily ring games.
He might play tournaments for a break from his routine, to take a shot at a big score, or to take advantage of opportunities to play higher stakes with relatively inexperienced players.
Tournament Professional— Whether poker tournament theory or semi-pro, this player competes regularly in poker tournaments poker tournament theory derives substantial income from the game.
He keeps a poker bankroll separate from his other finances, and while he may play ring games occasionally, tournaments are his bread and butter.
Field size The first question to ask is whether you want to play against dozens, hundreds, or thousands of competitors.
In tournaments, as in any other form of poker, good players make money from less good players.
And just as a good player would have a higher expectation sitting at a table with two fish than at a table with one fish, he can expect his Return on Investment ROI in a tournament to grow along with the size of the field.
If large field tournaments offer the highest expected return, why play anything else?
Lower variance is the biggest reason.
A strong online tournament player could easily have a six-figure annual expectation playing only on Sundays, when all of the major poker sites have their largest weekly tournaments.
However, he could also very easily lose six figures in any given year pursuing this strategy.
Such is the nature of variance in these huge tournaments.
That may be part of the excitement for the amateur or the ring game professional, but the tournament professional will need to supplement these very profitable long shots with more consistent winnings.
Time is another factor.
It may be less of a concern for a professional, but an amateur who enjoys the occasional tournament, or even a ring game professional accustomed to short sessions, may not have the time or energy to play his best for the hours or days it can take to final table a large tournament.
Buy-In To the amateur who does not operate from a bankroll, the deciding factors here will be the amount of money he is comfortable losing and the level at which he is competitive.
In general, winning tournaments with higher buy-ins requires defeating more skilled opponents, though there are important exceptions to this rule discussed below.
Players who cannot trust themselves to make the right decisions when the stakes get high should not enter the tournament at all, or at least should not do so expecting to win anything in the long run.
Given the variance in tournaments, a professional working off of a finite bankroll may actually have to play below his skill level, at least until he has his first big score.
Because ROI and standard deviation poker tournament theory vary with the size and difficulty of the field, there are no strict formulae for bankroll requirements.
For example, a small stakes player looking to grow his bankroll exclusively through tournaments with fields averaging 1000 runners can expect some severe swings and would need at least 100 buy-ins, preferably more, to pursue this strategy.
Although he might finish in the money 15% of the time, he will win primarily small prizes that will not offset his losses.
The top-heavy structure of tournament payouts concentrates the vast majority of the money at the final table.
An average player will make the final table only once out of every 100 attempts, and even a very strong player will do so only 2-3% of the time.
If the player were focusing instead on tournaments with an average field size of 100 players, he would likely final table well over 10% of the time.
His rewards would be disproportionately smaller, since ROI decreases with field size, but his variance would be lower as well.
In other words, he would be much less likely to experience a run of 100 tournaments with a significantly lower than expected number of final tables than would his counterpart playing tournaments with 1000 runners.
Ring game professionals need not be so cautious.
Variance will be extremely high, but since the player is playing it only once a week and presumably making money more consistently from his ring game play, he could safely add this tournament to the mix using whatever bankroll he finds sufficient for 1-2 NL.
Field Difficulty Although it is generally true that higher buy-in tournaments attract better players, there are important exceptions, such as how much publicity a tournament gets.
On a smaller scale, poker link may publicize a particular tournament through e-mails to their regular players, other advertisements, or a guaranteed prize pool.
Smaller buy-in tournaments, called satellites, that award seats to larger tournaments instead of cash, can also soften the field of a larger event by funneling in less experienced players who would not otherwise play at higher stakes.
Though tournaments for other poker games can be hard to find, they will often feature players who are much weaker than the worst No Limit players.
And because these games are rarely played in a tournament format, even the experts may lack familiarity with tournament theory.
Blind Structure Blind structure refers to how many chips players start with relative to the blinds and to how quickly the blinds and antes increase.
Amateurs looking to get the most play for their money should prefer tournaments that start with a lot of chips and raise the blinds slowly.
Those who expect to be outclassed might as well play shallow structures where the skill edge held by better players is minimized.
Professionals need to consider what kind of structure will play to their strengths and what will be best for their hourly rates.
Ring game pros may benefit from deeper stacks similar to those found in cash games, whereas tournament experts may find they make the best decisions when stacks are shallow, as they navigate these late-game situations much more frequently than their opponents.
Opportunity cost and hourly rate are also important factors for professionals.
Even though deeper stacks allow for more skillful play and higher ROI, this may not be enough to compensate for the https://pink-stuf.com/poker/free-online-poker-superstars-2.html that they make the tournament last longer.
A professional might earn more per hour in a shallow tournament than he would with a slightly higher ROI in a tournament that took much longer to finish.
Similarly, online professionals can more effectively multi-table tournaments with shallow structures, where many of their decisions will be binary choices between moving all-in or folding rather than complex strategies played out over multiple streets.
Antes The presence of antes, especially large ones, makes loose, aggressive play necessary.
Players who are adept at stealing and defending blinds should prefer large antes, whereas tighter players should seek out tournaments with small or no antes.
In general, Poker Stars and Party Poker feature smaller antes than those on Full Tilt Poker and Ultimate Bet, and live tournaments tend to have by far the largest antes.
Smaller live tournaments sometimes charge rakes of 20% or higher and withhold additional money to pay staff.
Combined with a shallow blind structure, such a high drop can make these tournaments nearly unbeatable.
The way the prize pool is paid out can be important as well.
Given that a player with a positive expectation is more likely than his adversaries to take first place, he will have a slightly higher ROI in an event that awards 35% of the prize pool to the champion than in one that pays only 25% for first.
In the second tournament, the additional 10% of the prize pool is distributed more flatly across a larger number of lower places, where the winning player is less likely to finish.
Depending on the payout structure, however, tightening up may actually be correct.
After this initial bubble, however, payouts climbed very slowly, without another 15K jump until 81st place.
Aggressive players would do better under a steeper payout scheme that punished excessively tight bubble play, whereas tight players or those very concerned about finishing in the money should prefer a structure with a pronounced bubble followed by a relatively flat payout.
Satellites Tournaments that pay winners with entry to a larger event rather than with cash can be uniquely profitable.
Some are winner-take-all affairs that capture the benefits of a top-heavy payout structure discussed above.
Though these are high variance, they offer a marginal boost to ROI relative to a flatter payout.
Satellites that pay multiple spots represent the opposite end of the spectrum, a completely flat payout, and can also offer a unique edge.
When navigating the bubble of these satellites, players who do not adapt in sometimes counter-intuitive ways can bleed equity to their more knowledgeable counterparts.
Satellites can create bankroll dilemmas, however.
For players looking to take occasional shots at high buy-in tournaments, especially high profile events that may be uniquely enjoyable or profitable, poker tournament theory can make such an opportunity affordable.
The edge from the satellite itself is an added bonus.
Unless there is an option to cash out the seat, however, tournament professionals should be wary of regularly playing satellites at poker tourney home clock poker limits of their bankrolls.

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